Author: Father Pitt

  • Common Mallow (Malva neglecta)

    Malva neglecta

    A little mallow that grows in lawns and vacant lots everywhere. It usually passes unnoticed as just another weed in the grass, but a close look at its flowers shows us that they are just like Hibiscus or Rose-of-Sharon flowers, but on a smaller scale.

    Malva neglecta
    Cheeses
    Flower with an ant on it

    For a description of the species, see the Malva neglecta reference page.

    Common Mallow
    Photographed May 15 with a Kodak EasyShare Z981.
  • Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella damascena)

    Nigella damascena
    Photographed May 21 with a Kodak EasyShare Z981.

    This popular garden flower often escapes, and where a patch has once been planted, it reseeds itself year after year, spreading to wherever the seeds are carried by rain and gravity. It’s known by a large number of common names, among them Persian Jewels and Rattlebox. The latter name refers to the seed pods, which grow to balls about an inch in diameter that rattle when the seeds ripen and dry. These plants were growing on a bank in Beechview.

    Love-in-a-Mist
    Photographed May 24 with a Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z6.

    For Gray’s description of the species, see the Nigella damascena reference page.

  • Scarlet Pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis)

    Anagallis arvensis

    Little flashes of scarlet that peep out from sidewalk cracks, curbs, and other waste places. These were blooming in sidewalks and gravel in Beechview.

    Scarlet Pimpernel
    Anagallis arvensis

    For a description of the species, see the Anagallis arvensis reference page.

    Scarlet Pimpernel
    Photographed May 24 with a Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z6.

  • Johnny Jump-Up (Viola tricolor)

    Viola tricolor

    The original Pansy; it escapes easily, and can establish semi-permanent colonies in odd places. These were growing from cracks in the sidewalk on the South Side.

    Johnny Jump-Up
    Photographed May 15 with a Kodak EasyShare Z981.

    For a description of the species, see the Viola tricolor reference page.

  • Blisterwort (Ranunculus recurvatus)

    Ranunculus recurvatus
    Photographed May 12 with a Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z6.

    Also known as Hooked Crowfoot or Hooked Buttercup, this is another small and easily ignored species of buttercup. The plants favor moist woodlands, frequently in fairly dim light; they often form colonies along forest paths. This plant was growing in Bird Park, Mount Lebanon.

    For Gray’s description of the species, see the Ranunculus recurvatus reference page.